Archive for ‘Fractured Fairytale’

February 13, 2014

Goldi Rocks and the Three Bears

Goldi Rocks and the Three BearsTitle: Goldi Rocks and the Three Bears

Author: Corey Rosen Schwartz and Beth Coulton
Illustrator: Nate Wragg
Publisher: G.P. Putnam’ Sons, 2014
Book Type: Fiction
Ages: 4-8
Themes: Fractured Fairy Tale, Music

Opening Lines:
“Once upon a rock-and roll time,
three bears in a band jammed with ease.
The Papa Bear drummed,
the Mama Bear strummed,
and Baby bear ticked the keys.”

Synopsis (from Amazon website):

Papa Bear, Mama Bear, and Baby Bear know how to rock! But they need a new singer, so they audition everyone—the Three Pigs, Little Red Riding Hood, and more. To their dismay, no one seems just right. Could the perfect lead singer be the mysterious girl sleeping on Baby Bear’s keyboard?

Activities:

Have kids make their own musical instruments, guitar, bells and drums, and more. Then have a jam session.
Lesson plan on writing fractured fairy tales for 3rd-5th grades.

Why I Like This Book:

Goldilocks and the Three Bears has to be the most popular story to do a fractured fairy tale. I’m not sure why but this rhyming version by Ms. Schwartz rockets to the top of the charts for sheer originality and fun. The rhythm and pop feel of this rendition will engage today’s kids and their American Idol watching parents. This book is a pure read-aloud joy that is enhanced by the colorful pencil and digital illustrations.

gold_tryouts

Picture Book Writers: Check-out this wonderful post by Ms. Schwartz at the Writerly Wisdom blog where she discusses Rhyme and Meter in Goldi rock style!

One lucky winner will receive their choice of a signed copy of this book OR a free picture book critique from Ms. Schwartz. In the comments answer “What favorite pop song do you like to sing or bee-bop too?” Deadline to enter is February 20th 9pm PST.

My favorite song to rock out on these days is “Safe and Sound” by Capital Cities.

This review is part of Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Book series. Visit her site to see the other books recommended.

Disclosure: I received a F&G (fold and gather, not bound) copy of this story from the author. This review nevertheless reflects my own and honest opinion about the book.

August 31, 2011

The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs

“But like I was saying, the whole Big Bad Wolf thing is all wrong. The real story is about a sneeze and a cup of sugar.

Everyone knows the story of the three little pigs, or at least they think they do. In this clever re-telling Mr. Alexander Wolf tells his side of the story. He says it was just a big media spin.

This adaption of the classic tale is ingenious. I love the “reporting” narrative style. The illustrations complement the story-telling perfectly, starting from the newspaper style cover of the book. I’d recommend this book for kids 6+ as the story is based on the premise that the media twisted the story. Also in this rendition the wolf does eat two of the pigs.

Author: Jon Scieszka
Illustrator: Lane Smith

The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs

If you like this type of story also check out The Three Pigs by David Weisner. In this re-telling the pigs escape the Big Bad Wolf by jumping out of the page. The pigs go on a storybook adventure jumping in and out of other stories and eventually bring a fiery friend back to scare the wolf. This version is suitable for young kids.

April 12, 2011

Falling for Rapunzel

“Rapunzel, Rapunzel, throw down your hair!”

She thought he said, “Your underwear.”

One day a prince rides by and sees the girl of his dreams. He asks her to throw down various items so he can climb up and save her. But things don’t quite work out that way, due to series of mis-understandings. The book does end with the prince’s dreams coming true, but it’s not what you would expect. Afterall, it is a fractured fairytale.

My girls like the simple colorful images and rhyme. The author does a good job with the page-turns in holding the reader’s suspense of “what did Rapunzel throw down next”. This is a refreshing re-telling of a classic. Kids do not need be familiar with the original Rapunzel to enjoy this rendition.

Grab this book from the library and have a few chuckles!

Author: Leah Wilcox
Illustrator: Lydia Monks

Falling for Rapunzel

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